Academics

ACADEMICS

Course Catalog

Women as senior leaders in the Church are unusual, rare; we celebrate our appointments to senior roles as momentous. It seems almost heretical to suggest that the real reason we celebrate is because we are still amazed at our ability to surmount the weight of institutionally embedded patriarchal oppression (which is and always has been the structural injustice preventing women's progress)' Dr Jenny Te Paa Daniel (2013). This course will encourage participants to undertake a critical exploration of the obstacles and opportunities for Anglican women in church leadership locally and globally. Using a case study approach, it will require serious interrogation of both the quantitative assertions (so readily advanced as evidence of 'progress' being made) and analysis of the qualitative reality provided by women leaders themselves. Seminar-­‐style with lectures, discussions and independent research expected. Evaluation will be based upon attendance and generous participation in discussions. There will be an opportunity to present preliminary findings for the final written paper. Intended for MDiv and MA/MTS students.

This seminar for advanced students in all GTU degree programs (upgrade is available for doctoral students) will explore the theological intersections of eros, embodiment, and human relationality through the lenses of Christian systematic theology more broadly and queer theology more specifically. In critical conversation with work on the theological dimension of sexual desire, queer theory and queer theology, and nuanced views of gender and embodiment, this course will examine how sacred and carnal desires converge in actual bodies, reconfiguring relational possibilities as part of the inbreaking of the eschatologically “new.” Active seminar participation and occasional leadership, brief reading responses, and a final theological research paper are the course requirements. Course may be pass/fail.

This course introduces the practice and theory of moral formation, discernment, and conduct through the lens of Christian Ethics. Ethics is viewed as the art-science bringing Christian traditions and critical theory to the tasks of: 1) discerning what is right for any given situation, 2) finding moral-spiritual power to act on that discernment, and 3) discovering what forms individuals and society toward the good and what mal-forms away from it. The course includes some emphasis on Anglican and Lutheran perspectives, and holds social transformation toward justice and ecological well-being as an inherent aim of Christian ethics. This course is jointly offered by CDSP & PLTS.

This online course introduces the practice and theory of moral formation, discernment, and conduct through the lens of Christian Ethics. Ethics is viewed as the art-science bringing Christian traditions and critical theory to the tasks of: 1) discerning what is right for any given situation, 2) finding moral-spiritual power to act on that discernment, and 3) discovering what forms individuals and society toward the good and what mal-forms away from it. The course includes some emphasis on Anglican and Lutheran perspectives, and holds social transformation toward justice and ecological well-being as an inherent aim of Christian ethics. This course is jointly offered by CDSP & PLTS.

Introduction to the music of the Episcopal Church, to prepare students both to exercise musical leadership in Episcopal liturgy and to develop guiding philosophies for the implementation of music in parish life. Lecture/discussion. Reflection papers, chanting and a final/paper defining a personal philosophy of liturgical music.

This is a course in historical Christian spirituality. It focuses on diverse writers who use or exemplify the motif of journey or pilgrimage, from the second century through the twentieth Past versions of the course have included some of the following" Perpetua of Cathage, Ingatius of Antioch, Origen, Augustine of Hippo, Gregory of Nyssa, Bernard of Clairvaux, Bonaventure, Dante, Martin Luther, John Bunyan, Teresa of Avila, and Evelyn Underhill, in their own words. Readings are subject to change until the syllabus is published, Lectures and discussions. The course is evaluated through two papers of 8-­‐10 pages each. It is intended for MDiv and MA/MTS students.

This course will examine the work of several Anglican-identified theologians treating a variety of themes and topics. This will allow us to encounter and learn from the many ways in which Anglican theologies are engaged theologies, theologies that challenge us to rethink how we imagine and interact with both church and world, and that provoke deep transformations in the lived life of faith. This is a seminar course focused on close reading and discussion of texts by Sarah Coakley, Kelly Brown Douglas, Jay Emerson Johnson, William Stringfellow, Kathryn Tanner, Keith Ward, and Rowan Williams, along with a few stand-alone articles. The requirements are active classroom participation and a research paper of 18–20 pages on the work of an Anglican theologian not encountered directly in the course readings, selected in consultation with the instructor. The course is appropriate for students in all degree programs and there are no prerequisites.

What theological commitments shape how different communities conceptualize and practice being church? And how do larger social, cultural, political, and economic realities affect the ways those commitments are lived out? In this course, we will examine the interplay between theologies of church (ecclesiology) and the pressures of our present moment, helping us understand more clearly both the nature and purpose of church and how churches can best respond to and serve the world. With a scope that is broadly ecumenical, though with a special emphasis on Anglicanism, we will explore contemporary modes of church, from the traditional to the experimental. This seminar-style course will acquaint students with long-standing and nascent models of church as a means of mapping the contemporary ecclesiological landscape. This will also allow students to examine the ways in which churches are simultaneously reflective and generative of larger theological commitments and are inevitably shaped by socio-political, cultural, and economic realities. Throughout the course, students will be required to bring their developing ecclesiological sensibilities to bear in evaluating the extent to which the character and practice of church should embrace or re-think its historical traditions, on the one hand, and accommodate or critique the wider context in which it is embedded, on the other. Active participation in class discussion, writing assignments consisting of responses to class readings, and four short essays are the central requirements.

This is a seminar course, providing students in the CDSP Low-Residence MDiv program with tools to support their continued experiential learning in the second semester of field placement. As a seminar, the course will involve reading, lectures, discussion, and student papers and presentations. This class will focus on congregational, group, and team dynamics, mechanisms for leading diverse groups in participatory processes, and the development of goals and plans for the second semester placement experience.

This seminar course will explore the ministry of creating theological vision and educational strategies to enable congregations to "turn outwards" and become more fully engaged in service, advocacy, and justice in their specific social and cultural contexts. Students will engage in reading and research, analyze a variety of approaches to forming faith communities engaged in social ministries, observe and analyze particular congregations and their ministries, interact with guest presenters, and develop a visioning, formation, and education plan for a particular congregation. Lecture/seminar, field observations, student presentations, opening and closing reflection papers, major educational design project.