Continuing Education

CONTINUING

CALL Online Fall 2017

September 18 - November 6, 2017

This course will examine the liturgical principles underlying the planning process for Episcopal Church worship, with a specific emphasis on the history, theology, and use of the 1979 Book of Common Prayer. By the end of this course, students will be able to exhibit general knowledge and proficiency in the liturgical practices of the Episcopal Church, and understand and apply principles of liturgical planning for leadership in the Episcopal Church.

Instructor: The Rev. Dr. Melissa Hartley

Melissa Hartley is the Associate University Chaplain at Sewanee: The University of the South, in Sewanee, Tennessee, where she coordinates worship for All Saints' Chapel and teaches in the Doctor of Ministry and Non-Degree Theological Studies programs at the School of Theology. Melissa is an Episcopal priest from the Diocese of Atlanta and has served parishes in Georgia, New York, and New Jersey. She holds the following degrees: B.A., University of the South; M.Div., S.T.M., General Theological Seminary; Ph.D. (Liturgical Studies), Drew University.

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September 18 - November 6, 2017

This course is designed for diaconal students and anyone else interested in facilitating the social ministry of the church in its active engagement with the world. Participants will study the nature of social ministry and its link to the Baptismal Covenant. Urgent contemporary social issues facing society and the church, including poverty, health care, racism, and violence, will be explored, along with church ministries and secular programs which address these issues. Participants are asked to visit and reflect on their experience of various programs in their community in order to become familiar with how the issues are manifested locally.

This course is part of the diaconal curriculum developed in partnership with AED.

Instructor: Sr. Pamela Clare Magers

Pamela Clare Magers, CSF (Ph.D. in anthropology, University of Arizona) is a member of the Community of St. Francis and is on the faculty of the School for Deacons in the Diocese of California.

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September 18 - November 6, 2017

George Herbert described prayer as “reversed thunder” and even as an “engine against the Almighty.” Although prayer is often understood as a practice of quiet submission and thanksgiving, there are strands within the Jewish and Christian traditions in which prayer functions as a form of protest against God, especially when God seems to permit horrendous evil and suffering. This course will explore the tradition of protest prayer in the Psalms, the book of Job, Jewish midrash, Desert monastics, Medieval mystics, post-Holocaust authors, African-American spirituals and more. Students will respond to this literary tradition by reading critically and prayerfully, participating in online discussion, writing their own protest prayer and attending to the ways in which God appears to respond to this bold and perhaps brazen spirituality. Throughout the course, we will explore ways that this theodical prayer and prayerful theodicy can be employed as a spiritual resource for expressing resentment and rage and for coping with pain, catastrophe, and injustice.

Instructor: The Rev. Dr. Daniel London

Daniel London has taught courses on Christian Spirituality, the Gospel of John, World Religions and Christian Social Ethics at CDSP, GTU, and the Episcopal School for Deacons. He has presented papers at academic conferences across the country, including the American Academy of Religion, the Society of Biblical Literature and the Colloquium on Violence and Religion. His work has been published in Anglican Theological Review, Journal of Comparative Theology and Compass: A Review of Topical Theology. In his dissertation, he argued that the Fourth Gospel can be read and experienced as a resource for theodical prayer and prayerful theodicy. He currently serves as the Priest-in-charge at the Episcopal Church of the Redeemer in San Rafael CA.

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September 18 - November 6, 2017

Parish leadership and management are critical skills for clergy, but most clergy do not come to ordination from business leadership positions. Yet, these skills are necessary for proper direction of staff, vestry, and volunteers. This course will include canonical requirements, clergy leadership, parish roles and responsibilities, accountability, clarity of lexicon, parish monies, how to read church financial statements, understanding audits, parish policies and procedures, internal control, and ... what to ask when interviewing for a position.

Instructor: James Jordan, CPA

 James B. Jordan, CPA, MBA, has audited over 200 churches of various denominations. He has lectured seminary classes at Virginia Theological Seminary and Sewanee, and teaches Continuing Education Unit courses in the classroom and online for Church Divinity School of the Pacific. He is a frequent presenter at Diocesan Ministry Fairs and at the Episcopal Business Administrators Conference. He lives in Noonan, Georgia.

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September 18 - November 6, 2017

This course studies the ways the Bible has been received and has functioned in Anglicanism from the English Reformation to the present day. A dialogue between community and text that occurs in all scriptural communities of faith is a major focus. Both the Bible and the church are powerful shaping agents in this dialogue. The course traces the history of the Bible’s roles in Anglicanism, focusing on issues and concerns central to identity and mission. Examining ways in which the Bible has influenced and shaped worship and music, polity, evangelism, and theology will help refine and sharpen a focus on the Anglican community-text dialogue.

Instructor: Dr. Donn Morgan

Donn Morgan is Professor of Old Testament Emeritus at Church Divinity School of the Pacific. Always a student and teacher of the Bible, he also held administrative positions at CDSP (academic dean, president). He has been deeply involved in theological education in The Episcopal Church and the Graduate Theological Union, as well as teaching in Asia and England. His most recent books are Fighting with the Bible and Manifesto for Learning.

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September 18 - November 6, 2017

This course is a theological introduction to the four Gospels with a goal of outfitting students for preaching, teaching, and making disciples in their local communities. While not ignoring historical issues, it will focus primarily on reading the Gospels as a theological story by emphasizing two themes: First, Jesus Christ is presented literarily as the fulfillment of the Jewish scriptures. Second, Jesus mentored his followers, equipping them to proclaim the good news and to form communities of disciples.

Instructor: The Rev. Reed Carlson

Reed Carlson is a doctoral candidate in the Committee on the Study of Religion at Harvard University. A Fulbright scholar and Episcopal Church Foundation fellow, Reed has taught biblical studies courses at Harvard Divinity School, Luther Seminary, North Central University, and United Theological Seminary of the Twin Cities. Before doctoral work, Reed was Campus Minister at St. Matthew's Episcopal Church in Cambridge, MA. His research concerns spirit phenomena in biblical literature and in Second Temple Judaism.

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