Academics

ACADEMICS

Course Catalog

Exegetical and theological study of Paul's letters as expressions of an early Christian contextual theology. Location of each letter inthe whole Pauline corpus. Survey of theological themes with emphasis on their contemporary relevance.

Exegetical and theological study of Paul's letters as expressions of an early Christian contextual theology. Location of each letter in the whole Pauline corpus. Survey of theological themes with emphasis on their contemporary relevance. Audio podcasts. Discussion forums/assignments/research paper.

Faith in a pluralistic, postmodern culture cannot simply be absorbed from one’s community; it must be constructed. Influenced by insights of developmental psychology, ethnography and sociology, this course prepares students to prepare programming and shape formation experiences rooted in an understanding of the context in which individuals live and worship. Assignments include an opening paper in which students explore their theology and teaching philosophy, a reflective ethnographic paper on an unfamiliar community of faith, a 20-minute teaching presentation and a final paper reflecting on the opening paper in light of the experiences of the semester.

[22 maximum enrollment; PIN code required; auditors with faculty permission]

This is the in-class version of ED 8110. Students who want to register for the in-class or hybrid version should use this course number. Students who want to take the online-only version of this class should register for ED 8110.

Faith in a pluralistic, postmodern culture cannot simply be absorbed from one’s community; it must be constructed. Influenced by insights of developmental psychology, ethnography and sociology, this course prepares students to prepare programming and shape formation experiences rooted in an understanding of the context in which individuals live and worship. Assignments include an opening paper in which students explore their theology and teaching philosophy, a reflective ethnographic paper on an unfamiliar community of faith, a 20-minute teaching presentation and a final paper reflecting on the opening paper in light of the experiences of the semester.

This course is the online version of ED 1225. Before registering, students should contact the instructor via email at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. for a PIN code.

[15 max enrollment; PIN code required; auditors excluded]

This course examines the book of Isaiah from the central Jewish and Christian frames of hope and peace. These major focii, hope and peace, present the opportunity to interrogate the total scope of the book of Isaiah as well as its constituent parts. Hope and peace will also assist in reading the book in the midst of contemporary challenges such globalization, war, terrorism, national security, ethnic identity and boundaries. Participants will spend time reflecting on theological appropriations of the book of Isaiah in the context of the book itself and various present day social settings. Participants will be assessed based upon discussions, written assignment, presentations, and project development. This course fulfills the Prophets requirement for PLTS students. Course offered jointly by PLTS and CDSP.

This seminar explores the Christian rites surrounding care of the sick, the dying and funerals from historical, theological and ritual perspectives. The course will survey the historical development of the rites before turning to a comparative ecumenical study of current traditions. Issues of inculturation, the dialogue between medicine and spirituality, and contemporary ritual challenges and efficacy will also be entertained.

As mainline religions struggle to redefine themselves to be relevant and authentic in the world, sacred music continues to point to the Divine by acknowledging the authentic need for human beings to connect with the heart of the Eternal. This course will address historical and current aspects of Sacred Music through readings, lectures, class discussion, music listening and attendance both at liturgies and concerts, thereby deepening understandings and insights of the significance and necessity of sacred music in the contexts of both sacred worship and secular society.

This course examines the Christian doctrine of soteriology in an interreligious context. While approached from a Christian Trinitarian perspective, this course will explore the connections with other religious traditions by engaging in readings across religious difference. We will explore the varieties, ideas, and metaphors of soteriology, redemption, and atonement that compound historic and contemporary theological expressions of Christian, Jewish, Islamic, and other relevant religious traditions. How might we make sense of what redemption, healing, the overcoming of division and death is expressed in the experience of animistic and indigenous religious context and compare and contrast them to Jewish and Christian elaborations of redemption as personal, social, cosmic, relational, mutual force.

The preparation and offering of choral literature and other liturgical music provides participants with a broader understanding and appreciation of the history and practice of church music. Schola Cantorum sings regularly for CDSP Community Eucharist on Thursday evenings at 5:45pm and a pre-­‐service rehearsal at 5:25pm. Pass/Fail or audit only.

This course will introduce students to the spirituality and theology of the Fourth Gospel as well as current Johannine scholarship, with a particular focus on reading the gospel in light of mimetic theory. Students will gain a thorough methodological understanding of mimetic theory and learn to apply the theory to particular passages in John in order to illuminate questions of suffering and theories of atonement. By paying special attention to four Johannine pericopes (the Call of Nathanael, the Man Born Blind, the Raising of Lazarus, and the Passion Narrative), students will analyze how the Johannine Jesus responds to the human propensity to blame by inviting readers into the abundant life as the divine forgiving victim. Intended for MDiv and MA students.